Educational objectives

tarix26.03.2018
ölçüsü40.42 Kb.

Hepatorenal Syndrome: Diagnosis, Management, and New Advances 

in Therapy 

 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES 

1.

 

Review the etiology, risk assessment, and diagnostic criteria for different types of hepatorenal 

syndrome (HRS); 

2.

  Describe current dosage and administration, indications, and contraindications of existing 

and emerging therapies for HRS; 

3.

 

Explain new advances in treatment options for HRS and the data supporting new 

therapeutic strategies; and 

4.

  Discuss the clinical pharmacist’s role in the management of HRS in hospital/health care 

systems settings. 

 

 

 

Posttest Questions, Answers, and Rationale 

 

1.

 

All of the following are typical characteristics of patients with hepatorenal syndrome 

(HRS), EXCEPT: 

A.

 

Cirrhosis with ascites 

B.

 

Serum creatinine (SCr) > 1.5 mg/dL 

C.

 

Absence of shock 

D.

 

Presence of parenchymal kidney disease*** 

 

Correct answer:  D 

Rationale:

  HRS is a functional renal failure occurring in patients with advanced cirrhosis. The major 

difference in HRS as compared with other types of acute kidney injury in patients with hepatic disease is 

the absence of parenchymal kidney disease. 

 

 

 

2.

 

Immediate discontinuation of intravenous vasoconstrictor therapy should be considered in 

the presence of all of the following adverse effects, EXCEPT: 

A.

 

Myocardial ischemia 

B.

 

Tachycardia*** 

C.

 

Digital cyanosis 

D.

 

Mesenteric ischemia 

 

Correct answer:  B 

Rationale:

  Adverse effects with vasoconstrictor therapy are common. Immediate discontinuation of 

vasopressor therapy should be considered if significant ischemia is present (myocardial, digital, or 

mesenteric). Extreme caution in re-initiating therapy is warranted if any of these severe adverse drug-

related events occur. Dosage reduction can be considered with less severe adverse effects, such as 

tachycardia. 

 

 

 

 


3.

 

Which of following is MOST likely to trigger HRS type I in a patient with severe cirrhosis 

and ascites: 

A.

 

Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis*** 

B.

 

Diarrhea 

C.

 

Discontinuation of furosemide and spironolactone 

D.

 

Propranolol prophylaxis for esophageal varices 

 

Correct answer:  A 

Rationale:

  Bacterial infections are the most important risk factor for the development of HRS. 

Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis has the highest incidence of HRS, with as many as 33% of patients with 

the infection developing HRS. Although diarrhea can cause hypovolemia, it is less likely than 

spontaneous bacterial peritonitis to trigger HRS. Overuse of furosemide and spironolactone may 

precipitate HRS and discontinuation of drug therapy is necessary if HRS develops. Using propranolol or 

other beta blockers for the prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding may affect blood pressure, but is 

not considered a usual trigger for HRS. 

 

 

4.

 

All of the following are appropriate goals for vasoconstrictor therapy in patients with HRS, 

EXCEPT: 

A.

 

Increase urine output 

B.

 

Increase mean arterial pressure by > 10 mm Hg 

C.

 

Decrease serum creatinine to < 1.5 mg/dL 

D.

 

Reduce Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to lower patients status on 

transplant list*** 

 

Correct answer:  D 

Rationale:

  The goal of vasoconstrictor therapy is to improve urine output and decrease SCr. The initial 

goal for titration is to increase the mean arterial pressure by > 10 mm Hg. An unintentional consequence 

of treating HRS is that improving renal function decreases a patient’s MELD score, which lowers their  

 

 

5.

 

All of the following are potential roles for the clinical pharmacist in the management of 

HRS, EXCEPT: 

A.

 

Identification of potentially nephrotoxic medications 

B.

 

Discuss the potential benefits and risks of therapeutic options 

C.

 

Determine when to initiate renal replacement therapy*** 

D.

 

Outline a plan for vasoconstrictor titration and monitoring 

 

Correct answer:  C 

Rationale:

  The clinical pharmacist is responsible for identifying any medications that may be 

contributing to the patient’s acute kidney injury (AKI) and to provide a recommendation for discontinuing 

and/or changing to less nephrotoxic options. Pharmacists can help providers understand the potential risks 

and benefits of therapeutic options. This allows for an informed and patient specific decision to be made 

regarding therapy. The pharmacist’s expertise is commonly needed to assist with monitoring and 

optimizing vasoconstrictor therapy because it differs from the strategies typically used for vasodilatory 

shock. Ultimately, the nephrologist will be the person to determine whether renal replacement therapy 

should be prescribed. 

 

   

 

 

 

6.

 

Which of the following is the MOST appropriate intravenous dosing strategy for 

vasopressin for the treatment of HRS: 

A.

 

Use a fixed dose of 0.04 units/min 

B.

 

Initiate at 0.04 units/min and titrate every 30 to 60 minutes to achieve > 10 mm Hg 

increase in MAP from baseline*** 

C.

  Start vasopressin at 0.8 units/min and titrate down if ischemic complications occur 

D.

 

Vasopressin 40 unit bolus, repeat every 20 minutes as needed to maintain a MAP 

increase > 10 mm Hg from baseline 

 

Correct answer:  B 

Rationale: 

 See 

Table 3

. Vasopressin at a fixed dose of 0.03 or 0.04 units/min is the recommended dose 

for septic shock, not HRS. Answer choice B is most consistent with current recommendations for treating 

HRS. Answer choice C is not preferred because it may lead to significant ischemia-related adverse events. 

Answer choice D is not a dosing option for HRS and is reserved for advanced cardiac life support. 

     

7.

 

All of the following vasoconstrictor options have demonstrated the ability to improve HRS 

physiology, EXCEPT: 

A.

 

Dopamine*** 

B.

 

Terlipressin 

C.

 

Norepinephrine 

D.

 

Vasopressin 

 

Correct answer:  A 

Rationale:

  Dopamine has not been shown to be effective as monotherapy and the addition of renal dose 

dopamine to other vasoconstrictors does not improve outcomes. Terlipressin is an emerging therapy in the 

United States (although it is still awaiting U.S. Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approval) and is a 

preferred therapy per the guidelines. Norepinephrine and vasopressin are considered appropriate 

alternatives if terlipressin is not available.       

8.

 

Which of the following artificial organ support systems is most effective for reversing HRS: 

A.

 

Renal replacement therapy 

B.

 

Molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) 

C.

 

Prometheus 

D.

 

None of the above has demonstrated improved clinical outcomes when treating those 

with HRS; therefore, their routine use is not recommended*** 

 

Correct answer:  D 

Rationale:

  Artificial hepatic and renal support systems are a potential emerging therapy for the 

management of end-stage liver disease and HRS. However, current technology has failed to demonstrate 

significant improvements in mortality. Additionally, the systems are expensive and are complex to 

manage. 


 

 


9.

 

A recommendation to discontinue vasoconstrictor therapy when encountering futility 

regarding the management of those with HRS should be initiated at what time point during 

therapy? 

A.

 

After 4 days of appropriately titrated therapy with no response in SCr*** 

B.

 

After 10 days of appropriately titrated therapy with no response in SCr 

C.

 

After 14 days of appropriately titrated therapy with no response in SCr 

D.

 

Therapy should be continued until liver transplant, regardless of SCr 

 

Correct answer:  A 

Rationale:

  Therapy should be discontinued after 4 days if no change in SCr is observed, even with 

adequate dosage titration, because the likelihood of response to therapy is low at this point. Continuation 

beyond 4 days for nonresponders only results in an increase in both the cost and the risk of adverse 

events. There is no post-transplant benefit for nonresponders if therapy is continued until the time of liver 

transplantation. 

 

 

 

10.

 

All of the following are considered an appropriate use of albumin for patients who are at 

risk for HRS or those who already have HRS, EXCEPT: 

A.

 

Adjunctive administration during vasoconstrictor therapy 

B.

 

To determine the diagnosis of HRS 

C.

 

To prevent HRS in patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis 

D.

 

To supplement serum albumin to achieve a concentration > 4 g/dL*** 

Correct answer:  D 

Rationale:

  Albumin is the preferred intravascular volume expander for patients with HRS and its 

combined use with vasoconstrictors may improve response. The administration of albumin is preferable to 

normal saline volume resuscitation when establishing the diagnosis of HRS. Albumin administration on 

days 1 and 3 of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis can reduce HRS and mortality. Administering albumin to 

achieve a specified serum concentration has not been studied and should not be routinely recommened.   

:

courses
courses -> Paranoyak olman, peşinde olmakdıkları anlamına gelmez
courses -> Ultrasonografide kullanilan ses dalgalarinin özellikleri
courses -> Jerry M. Burger
courses -> The Humanistic approach has emerged in the late 1960’s, primarily as a reaction to the two major views of humanity popular at that time
courses -> Degeneration vs. Progeneration Science and Pseudoscience
courses -> Assemblers
courses -> Using the assembler
courses -> Lecture 6 Assembler Directives
courses -> Generate machine language
courses -> Mips assembler Programming Prof. Sirer cs 316


Dostları ilə paylaş:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


eitmilsinxron-trcm--.html

eitorf-merten-st-agnes---13.html

eitorf-merten-st-agnes---3.html

eitorf-merten-st-agnes---8.html

eitsel-ve-mesleki.html